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Space Shuttle

The graduate training program in Space Life Sciences at Texas A&M University is sponsored by:
NASA NSBRI
Graduates
Ramon Boudreaux


Ramon Boudreaux
Fellows Class of 2011
PhD Biomedical Engineering 2014
Currently focusing on Effects of reduced gravitational weight bearing (1/6 g) and radiation exposure on bone’s ability to recover via an exercise countermeasure.



Bradley W. Cox
Bradley W. Cox 
Fellows Class of 2008
PhD Health Physics 2011
Area of Research: Brad is researching proton dose to astronauts conducting extra vehicular activity during solar particle events. He is currently researching proton tracks and secondary radiation production in shielding materials.



Brandon R. Macias
Brandon R. Macias
Fellows Class of 2008
PhD Kinesiology 2012
Area of Research: Brandon will be working on projects seeking to reduce muscle atrophy during spaceflight and limit damage when re-adapting to a gravitational environment (e.g., Mars, Earth, moon). His research will focus on elucidating oxidative stress and impaired stress protein signaling pathways in muscle before, during, and after simulated spaceflight.



Lauren Ritchie Lauren Ritchie
Fellows Class of 2010
PhD Genetics 2013
Currently, her research focuses on how dietary compounds affect inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colon cancer. In particular, her dissertation research will focus on the effect of antioxidants (e.g., anthocyanins and tannins) found in sorghum bran in maintaining bowel health. Specifically she will determine how these compounds alter inflammatory mediator gene expression, up or down regulate signaling through Toll-like receptors, and alter the bacterial diversity within the GI tract during bouts of inflammation.



Joshua M. Swift
Joshua M. Swift
Fellows Class of 2006
PhD Exercise Physiology
Area of Research: Pharmacological and exercise countermeasures to long-duration simulated microgravity effects on adult rodent weightbearing bones.  The role that osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis during hindlimb unloading has on weightbearing bone loss.  The role that reduced hindlimb blood flow during 28-day hindlimb unloading has on diminished bone mass.  Voluntary resistance exercise effects on osteoblast function and activity in aged rodents.